Kitchen measurements

METRIC vs IMPERIAL

When I cook I tend to chop and change fairly regularly between the metric and the imperial systems subsequently I thought it would be useful to set out a fairly straightforward conversion chart to help.

  IMPERIAL METRIC
Weights: 1 oz 25-28 g
2 oz 50 g
4 oz / ¼ lb 110 g
8 oz / ½ lb 225 g
12 oz / ¾ lb 350 g
16 oz / 1 lb 450 g
Liquids: 1 tsp 5 ml
1 tbsp 15 ml
2 fl oz 55 ml
3 fl oz 75 ml
5 fl oz / ¼ pt 150 ml
½ pt 275 ml
¾ pt 425 ml
1 pt 570 ml
1 ¾ pt 1 l

CUPS

I find the “Cup” system that is used in a number of countries downright confusing – particularly if you try and convert an ingredient into grams (for example: 1 cup of sugar = 200g, 1 cup of flour = 130g, and 1 cup of butter = 225g). In addition to that, there are different cup measurements according to the country that you are living in.  For instance, New Zealand follows a different cup system to that of the USA.

I am going to keep this simple…

 

CUP

VOLUME

METRIC CUP (as used in New Zealand, Australia, South Africa etc.)

1

 250ml

US CUP

1

240ml

TIP –       take a black marker pen and mark a container with cup measurements on it.  Then, measure your weights by their volume rather than going to all the hassle of trying to work out the weights according to the ingredient being used.

TEMPERATURES

A couple of weeks ago we had a plum/prune drying disaster as we failed to realise that the recipe we were following was in Fahrenheit and not Celsius, so I thought I would note down the conversions that apply to temperatures.

GAS MARK

CELSIUS

FAHRENHEIT

1

140 C

275 F

2

150 C

300 F

3

170 C

325 F

4

180 C

350 F

5

190 C

375 F

6

200 C

400 F

7

220 C

425 F

8

230 C

450 F

NOTE: Fan ovens tend to be a little bit hotter than a standard oven turn the oven temperature down a little e.g. if a recipe says 180C – use 170C fan.

ABREVIATIONS

tsp teaspoon
tbsp tablespoon
ml millilitre
l litre
fl oz fluid ounce
pt pint
g gram
kg kilogram
oz ounce
lb pound

I have put this information together with the help of a couple of sources, namely:

  1. Book of Cakes by Delia Smith;
  2. Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cup_(unit)#Metric_cup#
  3. Allrecipes.com – http://allrecipes.com/howto/cup-to-gram-conversions/

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